Doing the Easy Things

Easy things that are hard to do:

– Consistently going to bed at a decent hour

– Saving at least 10% of what you earn

– Moving your body every day

– Eating predominantly whole foods 

– Doing one thing every day that gets you closer to your goals

I’m sure you have a list of your own.

The sooner you start doing the easy things the sooner they will actually be easy.

In the long term, it’s easier to do the easy things than it is to deal with the consequences of not doing them. 

Take a look at the health care industry for example.

Preventative based healthcare is drastically less expensive and infinitely easier than treatment based healthcare in the long run, not to mention far more enjoyable. 

Pay for a gym membership and healthy foods or pay for medical treatments, higher insurance premiums, and reduced quality of life. 

As Jim Rohn said, you are paying either way. 

Second, don’t make easy things not easy.  

If you haven’t exercised in the past 10 years consistently don’t jump into high-intensity exercise every day for 60 minutes.  

You’re likely to get hurt, burnt out, and not last more than a month MAX. 

Instead, exercise for just 5 minutes a day.

Same goes for saving money.  

If you aren’t saving any right now go to 1% instead of straight to 10%.

Give your body, brain, and lifestyle time to adjust to the small changes over time.

You are a fragile piece of cold glass when it comes to habit change.

Cold glass breaks if it’s suddenly heated. The reason it breaks is that the heat isn’t being transferred (either in or out) uniformly through the entire body of glass, and the differences in expansion/contraction rates cause stress that’s relieved with a break. 

Your break can be quitting, anxiety, frustration, or actual physical and mental breakdown.   

Do the easy things and keep them easy.  

Brett “Easy Button” Denton